Horizon Inflammation Care
For U.S. Healthcare Professionals

OSTEOARTHRITIS (OA) IS A CHRONIC CONDITION

CHARACTERIZED BY JOINT DAMAGE AND INFLAMMATION1

OA IS THE MOST COMMON FORM OF ARTHRITIS, AFFECTING OVER 32 MILLION ADULTS IN THE UNITED STATES2

  • Common signs of osteoarthritis include joint pain, swelling, and stiffness3
  • Inflammation is a major factor associated with cartilage loss3

Treatment should aim to relieve both the inflammation and pain associated with OA.

EXPERTS RECOMMEND NSAIDS AS A FIRST-LINE PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OPTION IN OA4,5

American College of Rheumatology

Oral NSAIDs are the oral medications of choice for the treatment of OA and are strongly recommended in knee, hip, and/or hand OA. Topical NSAIDs are strongly recommended in knee OA4

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Recommends oral and topical NSAIDs as first-line pharmacologic treatment options for OA5

NSAIDS ARE EFFECTIVE SYMPTOMATIC OA THERAPIES6

NSAIDS RELIEVE THE INFLAMMATION AND PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH OA

  • NSAIDs inhibit the cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) enzymes from producing prostaglandins which are mediators of inflammation and pain6-8
  • NSAIDs are also known to have an analgesic effect6
  • Without
    NSAIDs
  • With
    NSAIDs
  • COX-1 or COX-2 binds to arachidonic acid.
  • COX-1 and COX-2 are enzymes that convert arachidonic acid into prostaglandins.
  • This leads to the creation of prostaglandins, which mediate inflammation and pain.8
  • NSAIDs bind to COX-1 or COX-2 so it cannot bind to arachidonic acid.6,8
  • COX-1 or COX-2 cannot trigger prostaglandin creation. Prostaglandin-induced inflammation and pain is reduced.6,8

DRAG TO SEE HOW NSAIDs REDUCE INFLAMMATION & PAIN

For illustrative purposes only. The mechanism of action of NSAIDs is not completely understood.7

Choose the most appropriate treatment option for your OA patients

Things to keep in mind when considering opioids

Get the facts

Consider the need for gastroprotection with NSAID therapy

See the data

See if a topical could be a more appropriate choice for OA knee pain

Review the research

REFERENCES

  1. Arthritis Foundation. Osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation website. https://www.arthritis.org/diseases/osteoarthritis. Accessed June 14, 2020.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Osteoarthritis (OA). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/osteoarthritis.htm. Accessed June 14, 2020.
  3. Goldring MB, Otero M. Inflammation in osteoarthritis. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2011;23(5):471-478.
  4. Kolasinski SL, Neogi T, Hochberg MC, et al. 2019 American College of Rheumatology/Arthritis Foundation guideline for the management of osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and knee. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2020;72(2):149-162.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nonopioid treatments for chronic pain. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/nonopioid_treatments-a.pdf. Accessed June 14, 2020.
  6. Crofford LJ. Use of NSAIDs in treating patients with arthritis. Arthritis Res Ther. 2013;15(suppl 3):S2.
  7. DUEXIS (ibuprofen and famotidine) [prescribing information] Horizon.
  8. Ricciotti E, FitzGerald GA. Prostaglandins and inflammation. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011;31(5):986-1000.

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